Making your plan to cast a vote on Tuesday

Readers will see two Memos this week. Today’s is all about elections. On Tuesday about midday you’ll get one that’s more like what you are used to seeing Monday, with calendar items and brief reports.


This one is about Tuesday’s Primary Election.

But you already voted in Early Voting? Awesome. Now you have time to get out the vote for your neighbors -- all over the state.


 

Good afternoon Weekly Memo fans,

You’ll be happy (maybe) to know that you’ll get two Memos this week. Today’s is all about elections. On Tuesday about midday you’ll get one that’s more like what you are used to seeing Monday, with calendar items and brief reports.
This one is about Tuesday’s Primary Election.

The Primary Election is Tuesday, June 26 and will run from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. no matter where you are in Maryland. To find out where to vote, county by county, check here.

If you did not take advantage of Early Voting, please make a plan for voting on Primary Day now, and see how much of the day you can clear between now and 7 a.m. Tuesday. You know there will be ambushes that can get in your way – that’s life. Plan to minimize the chance that these little obstacles will add up to a day when you meant to vote, but just couldn’t.

Please note that if you have moved recently and not amended your registration with the county elections folks, there’s a chance you may not be on the list at your new polling place.

ballot_box.jpgMany of the people affected by this computer glitch, as the Sun article indicates, may get an email from the state elections board alerting them to the problem. But if you are included, you will still have to locate the polling place for your new address, go there, and cast a provisional ballot – which the elections folks say will for sure be counted, no matter how close the race in question is.

This is all part of planning your own personal GOTV program to ensure your voice is heard.  And don’t forget to prompt your neighbors to plan their own path to voting on Tuesday.

So vote.

Traditionally we should tell you to exercise your right to vote for whom you want to.

But now we’re going to try to tell you who to vote for in the Democratic primary. Hope you don’t mind, but Progressive Maryland has endorsed progressive candidates throughout the state and we’re not going to miss a chance to tell you about them.

We have endorsed Ben Jealous for the Democratic nomination for governor. (The links from the candidates’ names will show you how they answered our questionnaire). Our blogs included hearty endorsements for Ben and Susie from Anne Arundel County and from the Lower Shore.

We have endorsed Donna Edwards for Prince George’s County Executive and Marc Elrich for the same position in Montgomery. Our most knowledgeable green MoCo blogger has outlined Elrich’s proposals for greening the county. Edwards, who has campaigned on education reform, received the endorsement of PGCEA, the county’s teacher’s union. Her opponent has received considerable financial support from developer interests.

In an important race for Congress, Progressive Maryland endorsed State Senator Roger Manno in his race for the 6th Congressional District Democratic nomination, joining the Maryland AFL-CIO (note that the Maryland AFL-CIO president Donna S. Edwards is not the Donna F. Edwards running in Prince George’s)

Also in Prince George’s Progressive Maryland has endorsed Victor Ramirez for State’s Attorney. He was the subject of two recent blog posts by Prince George’s activists for police and prison reform.

Leading Progressive Maryland chapter activists in Anne Arundel County have written in support of our endorsees Chrissy Holt (Dist. 30) and Eve Hurwitz (Dist. 33), both running for State Senator

Activists on the Lower Shore have banded together to bring progressive change to local government and the Democratic Central Committees in Wicomico.

Altogether, genuinely progressive candidates are on ballots around the state, for most General Assembly seats and for local office in Prince George’s, Montgomery, Baltimore city and county, Howard, Frederick and Anne Arundel, Somerset and Wicomico. You can find them all here. – our endorsements, and their responses to our detailed questionnaires.

So vote. But think about taking a progressive stance. We hope our work can help you.