Progressive Prince George's kicks off education improvement initiative

Prince_George's_Deserves_Better.jpgProgressive Prince George’s is launching an effort to mobilize parents, students and concerned members of the Prince George’s community to reset the conditions for educating our children for a sustainable future – one of good jobs, good education and an end of the school-to-prison pipeline (which grows whenever we don’t pay attention to the first two). Find out more here and save the date: Saturday, April 27.



 

Progressive Prince George’s is launching an effort to mobilize parents, students and concerned members of the Prince George’s community to reset the conditions for educating our children for a sustainable future – one of good jobs, good education and an end of the school-to-prison pipeline (which grows whenever we don’t pay attention to the first two).


Saturday, April 27 Alliance to Reclaim Our Schools Prince George’s Civic Academy on Funding 10:00 AM Casa De Maryland Headquarters• ​7978-B New Hampshire Ave., Hyattsville, MD 20783
Facebook Event page https://www.facebook.com/events/2281773442041217/

 


Examining the funding of schools through the lens of inequality

  In Prince George’s County, we have struggled for decades to overcome the disparity in funding between schools in well-off communities and schools in less well-off communities. Race plays a part.

In 1954, the Supreme Court ruled in Brown v. Board of Education that segregated public schools are unconstitutional.​

     Even decades after Brown v Board,  school finance litigation meant to equalize the playing field, and even after accounting for wealth disparities, the wrenching reality endures—the United States still invests significantly more money to educate children in white communities.​

    According to a report by Ed Build, nonwhite school districts receive $23 Billion less than white districts. Prince_George's_Deserves_Better.jpg

On the whole, nonwhite districts receive significantly less funding than white districts. ​

For every student enrolled, the average nonwhite school district receives $2,226 less than a white school district.

For decades states have been charged with filling in the gaps created by a concentration of wealth within invisible borders. ​

Local control of taxes benefits only the privileged few—small white districts created by arbitrary lines that can raise unfettered money for their schools. ​

As a general rule, states haven’t kept up with the gaps created by an inherently unequal distribution of wealth in a racially fractured society.​

Come to the Civic Academy on Funding Saturday, April 27 and learn more about how schools are unequally treated according to geography and demographics, and how to change that in Prince George’s County schools.


Read more about state moves on education here and here.